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29th July 2014

Link

The Family Dollar deal embodies everything wrong with American capitalism – Quartz →

28th July 2014

Link reblogged from Fuel By Dreams with 10 notes

What Your Workout Says About Your Social Class →

fuelbydreams:

jdgentleman:

Sort of interesting but melodramatic and at the fringes. I don’t see a lot of people pondering or judging about the emotional status fitness indicates. While elitism may happen in ability and leak into judgement of manhood. it’s not nearly as blatant or reactive as this acts. Perhaps it’s something more tangible in an older generation. When you enter gay males’ obsessive body categorization it get’s a bit more apparent and complex.

I agree with what JD has to say. 

Source: jdgentleman

28th July 2014

Photo with 1 note

I’m sad to be leaving Blacksburg, but I’m bringing back a bounty of beer. Thanks Virginia.

I’m sad to be leaving Blacksburg, but I’m bringing back a bounty of beer. Thanks Virginia.

27th July 2014

Photo

27th July 2014

Photo reblogged from ArtPropelled with 18 notes

artpropelled:

rizü takahashi

artpropelled:

rizü takahashi

26th July 2014

Link

If the World Began Again, Would Life as We Know It Exist? - Issue 14: Mutation - Nautilus →

25th July 2014

Photo reblogged from hotoke antiques with 31 notes

baisao:

(Mitate (見立て) - topicsから)
Sen no Rikyu using his outstanding aesthetic sense, decided the form of tea utensils and also brought into chanoyu objects which were not originally made for it. This was called ‘mitate’. The word ‘mitate’ means ‘to see an object, not in the form that was originally intended for it, but as another thing’, and was originally a literary term used in describing the technique of writing kanshi (Chinese poems) and Japanese waka. Rikyu really brought this spirit of ‘mitate’, which came from literary theory, to life by using everyday household articles as utensils for chanoyu. For example, there are anecdotes of a gourd that was originally a water flask being used as a flower container and of the entrance to a ship being used as the nijiriguchi (crawl-through entrance) for a tea room.Not only Rikyu, but tea practitioners of that time, went against the general trend of using Chinese utensils as tea bowls, bringing in tea bowls used in everyday life from the Korean peninsular for use as wabi-cha tea bowls. Things that came into Japan from the trade with southern countries were also used as tea utensils which could perhaps be called ‘mitate’. Bringing something into chanoyu in this way, to experimentally add a fresh and tasteful element is the spirit of ‘mitate’. In modern times Buddhist art was quickly taken into the tea room and also ceramics and glassware from all over the world, as well as metal goods, became tea utensils through the process of ‘mitate’.In our enjoyment of the experience of chanoyu and the innovations that we make, this spirit of ‘mitate’ could be said to be the root of chanoyu. For example, while on a trip one might be looking at the traditional local craft works and wondering if something could be used as a lid rest or an incense container. Thinking about this while taking a walk is one of the pleasures of travelling and is also the pleasure of a life in chanoyu. The spirit of ‘mitate’ which is part of an exceptional aesthetic awareness, can also give life to traditional crafts and industries.(Omotesenke Fushin’an - http://www.omotesenke.jp/english/chanoyu/6_3_1.html)http://hotoke-antiques.com

baisao:

(Mitate (見立て) - topicsから)

Sen no Rikyu using his outstanding aesthetic sense, decided the form of tea utensils and also brought into chanoyu objects which were not originally made for it. This was called ‘mitate’. The word ‘mitate’ means ‘to see an object, not in the form that was originally intended for it, but as another thing’, and was originally a literary term used in describing the technique of writing kanshi (Chinese poems) and Japanese waka. Rikyu really brought this spirit of ‘mitate’, which came from literary theory, to life by using everyday household articles as utensils for chanoyu. For example, there are anecdotes of a gourd that was originally a water flask being used as a flower container and of the entrance to a ship being used as the nijiriguchi (crawl-through entrance) for a tea room.

Not only Rikyu, but tea practitioners of that time, went against the general trend of using Chinese utensils as tea bowls, bringing in tea bowls used in everyday life from the Korean peninsular for use as wabi-cha tea bowls. Things that came into Japan from the trade with southern countries were also used as tea utensils which could perhaps be called ‘mitate’. Bringing something into chanoyu in this way, to experimentally add a fresh and tasteful element is the spirit of ‘mitate’. In modern times Buddhist art was quickly taken into the tea room and also ceramics and glassware from all over the world, as well as metal goods, became tea utensils through the process of ‘mitate’.

In our enjoyment of the experience of chanoyu and the innovations that we make, this spirit of ‘mitate’ could be said to be the root of chanoyu. For example, while on a trip one might be looking at the traditional local craft works and wondering if something could be used as a lid rest or an incense container. Thinking about this while taking a walk is one of the pleasures of travelling and is also the pleasure of a life in chanoyu. The spirit of ‘mitate’ which is part of an exceptional aesthetic awareness, can also give life to traditional crafts and industries.

(Omotesenke Fushin’an - http://www.omotesenke.jp/english/chanoyu/6_3_1.html)


http://hotoke-antiques.com

24th July 2014

Link with 1 note

Why Trying to Be Perfect Won’t Help You Achieve Your Goals (And What Will) - James Clear →

The ceramics teacher announced that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality.

His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the “quantity” group: fifty pounds of pots rated an “A”, forty pounds a “B”, and so on. Those being graded on “quality”, however, needed to produce only one pot — albeit a perfect one — to get an “A”.

Well, grading time came and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity!

It seems that while the “quantity” group was busily churning out piles of work — and learning from their mistakes — the “quality” group had sat around theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.

23rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from nyc art scene with 601 notes

nycartscene:

thru Aug 3:“Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010”The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYCSigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

nycartscene:

thru Aug 3:

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010

The Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53 St., NYC

Sigmar Polke (German, 1941–2010) was one of the most voraciously experimental artists of the twentieth century. This retrospective is the first to encompass the unusually broad range of mediums he worked with during his five-decade career, including painting, photography, film, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, television, performance, and stained glass, as well as his constant, highly innovative blurring of the boundaries between these mediums. Masquerading as many different artists—making cunning figurative paintings at one moment and abstract photographs the next—he always eluded easy categorization.

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from ArtPropelled with 34 notes

artpropelled:

Tadashi Nishihata

artpropelled:

Tadashi Nishihata